Scissor Sisters und SIOUXSIE & THE BANSHEES, The Strokes

"Bridget Jones Diarrhea" und "Megapussi" waren zwei der Pseudonyme, unter denen die New Yorker Disco-Ikonen Scissor Sisters unlängst neues Material vorstellten. Illustres Publikum in der New Yorker Mercury Lounge: Blondie Sängerin Debbie Harry sowie die Olsen Twins(!!). Titel der …
"Bridget Jones Diarrhea" und "Megapussi" waren zwei der Pseudonyme, unter denen die New Yorker Disco-Ikonen Scissor Sisters unlängst neues Material vorstellten. Illustres Publikum in der New Yorker Mercury Lounge: Blondie Sängerin Debbie Harry sowie die Olsen Twins(!!). Titel der sechs neuen Songs waren:
Can’t Decide /// Hybrid /// Everybody Wants (das schon bei Live 8 gespielt wurde) /// Other Side /// Cher Baby /// Paul McCartney
Es gab wohl sogar "Bridget Jones Diarrhoe" und "Megapussi" Merchandise zu kaufen.

Großen Einfluss auf ihre Musik hatten laut Scherenschwester Ana Matronic Siouxsie & The Banshees, die ihrerseits ihren gesamten Backkatalog remastern lassen und ab Oktober diesen Jahres zusammen mit einer Raritäten Cd wiederveröffentlichen wollen.

Sechster Stroke und ehemaliger Manager der (oben erwähnten) Mercury Lounge, Ryan Gentles, hat zusammen mit Drum Tech Matt Romano mal wieder für glänzende Augen bei allen Strokes Fans gesorgt: der vierteljährlich erscheinende Newsletter des "Alone, together" Fanclubs wartet nämlich mit Details über das dritte Strokes Album auf. Übder die Zusammenarbeit mit dem neuen Produzenten David Kahne äußerte sich Julian Casablancas so:
"I think he’s really cool. When you first meet him though, you can sort of get caught in the façade. He has a very technical knowledge and he’ll be very quick to casually spew it out. You might think he’s just some serious slick hit-maker and that he doesn’t care about music, but that’s what he’s all about: music. He cares about it so deeply that if you change a little part, and you’re hurting the song, he’ll cry.
He likes that atonal modern stuff, so he doesn’t mind being weird and original, and that’s what he prays for. But then, sometimes something that just has a cool thing that’s not popular, he’ll want to transform it into something that could be more accessible, but all it’s coolness is erased. That’s the main compromise that we have trouble with. I mean sure, I understand on every mindless level why it’s, like, pleasant, but no, it’s not what I want to sing. It’s the difference between lame and cool.
I guess the game has changed. It’s a new sort of approach. I always felt that it (Room on Fire) was sort of Part 2. Is This It was sort of a two-parter. Like the first 22 songs. It’s such a different process. I have a lot more trust now. David gets seriously good sounds, and I don’t even have to be there when they do the drums and bass and most of the guitars. I think we realized that what we wanted is not some professional slickness to our music, it’s the mixture of someone who has that kind of knowledge, with the kind of thing that we want– which is something that doesn’t exist too much. So it’s hard, we’re sort of inventing it as we go along."

HINTERLASSEN SIE EINE ANTWORT

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.